Contact Us

444 N. Capitol St. NW
Washington, DC 20001


Phone: 202-624-1478
Fax: 202-624-1475

Blog posts : "west virginia"

Energy Update, Sept. 7

September 7, 2012

In the States

 MD – Governor Martin O’Malley attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony of Maryland’s largest solar power facility, a $50 million project located on the grounds of Mount St. Mary’s University. The new 16.1 megawatt solar farm contains more than 200,000 photovoltaic panels, covering roughly 100 acres, and is expected to produce 20 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year, or enough energy to power 1,700 homes. Baltimore-based Constellation, a subsidiary of Exelon Corporation, built the facility, which is the result of a three-year-old state initiative to boost renewable energy production. "Solar energy means Maryland jobs," Governor O'Malley said. "Over the next 10 years, with efforts like this, we will be putting another 10,000 Marylanders to work on projects like this. There will be a day when solar panels will be as common as shingles on roofs." Solar lights up the Mount The Baltimore Sun and O’Malley talks jobs at solar farm’s completionThe Frederick News Post

 MI – Governor Rick Snyder joined the Michigan Public Service Commission and Consumers Energy in an effort to block the conversion of a natural gas pipeline to one that carries crude oil, citing the plan’s cost for the state’s consumers. Trunkline Gas, which operates two pipelines that carry natural gas to southwest Michigan, has requested that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) allow the transport of crude oil through one of its lines. According to Governor Snyder, who filed a motion with the FERC to block the company’s proposal, the pipeline supplies approximately one-third of Michigan’s natural gas. “This infrastructure is fundamental to energy supply and reliability in Michigan and is vital to heating our state's homes and businesses at affordable prices," Governor Snyder said. Gas pipeline conversion called costlyThe Detroit Free Press

 WV – Governor Earl Ray Tomblin along with leaders from Williams Partners L.P. announced the company will invest an additional $1.34 billion in processing capacity to help separate and to process natural gas liquids in northern West Virginia. Following Williams’ acquisition of two facilities and management of several pipelines in the state, this new investment, which is projected to create approximately 100 new long-term jobs, brings the natural gas company’s total investment in the region close to $4 billion. "Williams' commitment to Marshall County and the entire Northern Panhandle is an example of the growing opportunities Marcellus Shale development is bringing to West Virginia," said Governor Tomblin. "The investment and jobs will have lasting effects on the region as the workers needed will be operating and maintaining Williams' facilities and pipelines for many years to come." $1.34B Project to Add JobsThe Intelligencer / Wheeling News Register

 Federal News

 President Barack Obama issued an executive order calling for an increase in industrial energy efficiency, hoping to spur investment and the expansion of combined heat and power (CHP) processes in manufacturing facilities. CHP technologies generate heat and power simultaneously from one source, thereby burning less fuel, lowering emissions, and reducing energy costs. The order sets a national goal of expanding CHP capacity by 40 gigawatts by 2020, or an increase of 50% in cogeneration plants compared with today, and encourages federal and state partnerships to identify best practices. According to the administration, the new goal will lead to a decrease in carbon emissions by 150 million tons per year, save energy users about $10 billion a year, and result in roughly $40 to 80 billion in new capital investment. “We are taking another step to strengthen American manufacturing by boosting energy efficiency for businesses across the nation,” the President said. Obama sets new energy efficiency goalThe Hill and Obama order targets industrial efficiency, emissionsReuters

 The Obama administration also announced new vehicle fuel-efficiency standards intended to significantly cut American oil consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The new rules, which will apply to model years beginning in 2017, require all automobiles to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The rule additionally mandates an emission standard of 144 grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per mile for passenger car and 203 grams CO2 per mile for trucks. The National Automobile Dealers Association estimated that the standards will increase the price of a vehicle by approximately $3,000 and expressed the concern that 7 million Americans may be priced out of the new-car market. Greg Martin, General Motors’ executive director for communications, said “We expect the rules to be tough, but we have a strong history of innovation, and we’ll do our best to meet them.” EPA issues new fuel-efficiency standard; autos must average 54.5 mpg by 2025The Washington Post

Go Back

Energy Update, January 27, 2012

January 27, 2012

State of the State Addresses

Of the 30 Governors who have given their State of the State addresses this year, 17 have specifically discussed energy issues, much of the time in the context of job creation and retention.  California Governor Jerry Brown, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, and Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin said that renewable energy would bring green jobs to their states, while Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell, Alaska Governor Sean Parnell, and West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin each said that their states’ fossil fuel resources would bring more jobs.  Governor Tomblin praised recent oil, coal, and natural gas investments and the jobs they will bring while promising that “I will do everything in my power to make sure that West Virginia is positioned to take full advantage of this opportunity” to build an ethane cracker facility, which he said would bring thousands of manufacturing jobs.  Utah Governor Gary Herbert and Maine Governor Paul LePage said that new jobs would arise from low energy costs, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez said that the key to economic growth and environmental protection is “sensible, predictable regulations” on energy production, and Georgia Governor Nathan Deal proposed eliminating a sales tax on energy used for manufacturing as a way to retain their business.

In the face of the slow economic recovery, several Governors have proposed ideas that require no state funds or attract new private investment.  For example, Hawaii Governor Neal Abercrombie proposed legislation to incentivize companies to invest in energy infrastructure that would integrate more renewable energy into the grid, saying that “there is no legislation more critical to our future."  New York Governor Andrew Cuomo proposed several new initiatives, including attracting $2 billion in private investment for grid infrastructure and a program to increase energy efficiency in State buildings to be paid for with savings in energy costs.  Utah Governor Gary Herbert proposed creating an “energy research triangle” that would pair universities and industry to research energy production technologies.  Maine Governor Paul LePage proposed lifting a restriction on the amount of hydroelectric power produced. 

Governors commonly reflect on the previous year in their State of the State addresses to evaluate the progress that has been made.  California Governor Jerry Brown said that his State’s goal of producing 20,000 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020 was ahead of schedule and that billions of private clean energy investments had been made.  Delaware Governor Jack Markell said that hundreds of jobs were created in his State last year due to upgrades and conversions of power plants to lower emissions.  Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick cited his State’s policies on renewable energy in discussing that industry’s seven percent growth in 2011.  Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin referenced signing an agreement with other states to work with automakers on converting their vehicle fleets to run on natural gas.  Governor Hickenlooper also noted an agreement between energy companies and environmental groups to disclose materials used in the hydraulic fracturing process.

Some Governors used their speeches to urge federal government action on energy issues.  Utah Governor Gary Herbert said that the federal government needed to continue working with the State on siting and permitting of energy development.  Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell called on President Barack Obama and the U.S. Congress to accelerate the timetable for allowing oil and gas drilling off Virginia’s coast.  West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin said that he would continue to fight against attempts to increase regulation of coal and other energy resources.

The State of the State addresses announced a range of other proposals, including:

  • Washington Governor Christine Gregoire proposing a $1.50-per-barrel tax on oil produced in Washington that would be used to improve infrastructure such as roads and bridges.
  • Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber stating that his administration will adopt a ten-year energy plan this year.
  • Maine Governor Paul LePage proposing giving ratepayers a choice of whether to purchase renewable or traditional energy.
  • Missouri Governor Jay Nixon stating his intention to work with farmers to improve their energy efficiency in order to make the State’s agriculture industry more competitive.
  • Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin proposing an increase in the amount of renewable energy required in the State’s renewable energy portfolio to 75% by 2032.

Links to all of the Governors’ addresses can be found at the State of the State Speeches Calendar on Stateline.org

National News

President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address included an overview of his energy agenda for 2012, which he began to unveil in more detail after his speech.  In his remarks, President Obama announced that he is opening 75 percent of potential offshore oil and gas reserves to development and opening enough federal land to renewable energy development to power 3 million homes.  The Defense Department will purchase much of that new renewable energy.  He also said that his administration would help develop domestic natural gas resources and separately called on Congress to pass legislation to provide production tax credits for renewable energy.  In addition, The President called for the disclosure of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing on federal lands and proposed providing energy-efficiency incentives to manufacturers.  Since the speech, President Obama has released a “blueprint” detailing these proposals, which he calls an “all-of-the-above strategy,” and has gone on a nationwide tour to promote it.  The blueprint includes a proposal to incentivize greater use of natural gas as a transportation fuel and calls for doubling the country’s clean energy output by 2035.  State of the Union Address TranscriptWhite House and Energy Blueprint Fact SheetWhite House and Obama pitches ‘all-of-the-above’ energy strategyNational Public Radio

In the Republican response to President Obama’s State of the Union address, Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels criticized the President for rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline proposal, which he said was “perfectly safe” and “would employ tens of thousands.”  Governor Daniels called for a free-market approach to energy, with lower taxes and fewer loopholes, fewer regulations, and maximizing domestic energy production.  He also characterized the President’s energy policies as “pro-poverty” for increasing consumers’ costs while not improving public health or the environment.  Full text of GOP’s State of the Union responseMcClatchy

President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address included an overview of his energy agenda for 2012, which he began to unveil in more detail after his speech.  In his remarks, President Obama announced that he is opening 75 percent of potential offshore oil and gas reserves to development and opening enough federal land to renewable energy development to power 3 million homes.  The Defense Department will purchase much of that new renewable energy.  He also said that his administration would help develop domestic natural gas resources and separately called on Congress to pass legislation to provide production tax credits for renewable energy.  In addition, The President called for the disclosure of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing on federal lands and proposed providing energy-efficiency incentives to manufacturers.  Since the speech, President Obama has released a “blueprint” detailing these proposals, which he calls an “all-of-the-above strategy,” and has gone on a nationwide tour to promote it.  The blueprint includes a proposal to incentivize greater use of natural gas as a transportation fuel and calls for doubling the country’s clean energy output by 2035.  State of the Union Address TranscriptWhite House and Energy Blueprint Fact SheetWhite House and Obama pitches ‘all-of-the-above’ energy strategyNational Public Radio

In the Republican response to President Obama’s State of the Union address, Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels criticized the President for rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline proposal, which he said was “perfectly safe” and “would employ tens of thousands.”  Governor Daniels called for a free-market approach to energy, with lower taxes and fewer loopholes, fewer regulations, and maximizing domestic energy production.  He also characterized the President’s energy policies as “pro-poverty” for increasing consumers’ costs while not improving public health or the environment.  Full text of GOP’s State of the Union responseMcClatchy

Go Back

Energy Update, January 13, 2012

January 13, 2012

In the States

CA – Governor Jerry Brown has proposed using half of the estimated $1 billion in revenues from the State’s cap-and-trade auctions to reduce California’s $9.2 billion deficit.  Funds from the cap-and-trade program are required to be spent on projects related to greenhouse gas emissions; the Governor has said that the money sent to the general fund will pay for existing greenhouse gas-related projects.  Some business groups oppose the move, saying that it is not authorized by the cap-and-trade law, and have said they will challenge the State in court if a budget passes in which auction proceeds pay for general fund projects.  Brown sees $500 million cap-and-trade fees for California budgetBloomberg and Gov. Brown’s cap-and-trade spending plan angers businessesLos Angeles Times

ME – In remarks to wood product industry representatives, Governor Paul LePage expressed his support for a proposed natural gas pipeline into central Maine.  Governor LePage said that while the State "is not in a position where it can help fund a pipeline," he assured companies interested in investing in the project that he would help streamline the approval process.  "There is a lot we're doing to try to encourage some natural gas here," he said.  During an earlier radio address, Governor LePage also said he does not endorse a citizens’ initiative to strengthen the State’s renewable energy portfolio, saying “It’s not good and I’m going to be fighting it all year.”  Governor LePage also vetoed a bill that passed the House and Senate unanimously that would have tightened energy efficiency standards for new state buildings; the veto, however, was later sustained.  LePage pledges to tackle energy costs to improve business climateBangor Daily News and LePage supports natural gas projectPortland Press Herald and Maine Senate sustains LePage vetoesLewiston Sun Journal

VA – Governor Bob McDonnell has unveiled his 2012 energy policy agenda that he says will help the State become the “Energy Capital of the East Coast.”  One of his proposals would direct $500,000 to wind energy research to help companies develop offshore wind farms when the federal government leases areas off the coast.  Another proposal would help fund conversion of some State vehicles to alternative fuels.  Other initiatives include strengthening oversight of wells and pipelines and increased investment in energy efficiency programs.  The Governor also called on the federal government to open up offshore areas to oil and gas exploration and drilling.  Va. Gov. McDonnell outlines energy agenda; slams U.S. limits on off-coast oil, gas explorationWashington Post

WV – Governor Earl Ray Tomblin’s office announced his administration is focusing on promoting the development of natural gas and coal resources rather than state initiatives to begin or expand renewable energy projects.  The Governor’s Chief of Staff, Rob Alsop, said that the Governor believes that natural gas will not only be a good source for energy, but its by-products will reinvigorate the manufacturing sector as well.  On wind power, Alsop said that it can be successful only with federal tax incentives and that state programs have little effect.  Governor’s office: State energy focus on gas and coalState Journal 

Federal News

President Barack Obama has signed a bill into law that will increase regulations on pipelines, following a series of pipeline bursts that have killed and injured people as well as caused environmental and property damage.  The new law, passed with bipartisan support, will require automatic valves where “feasible,” increase the number of pipeline inspectors, and increase the maximum fine for safety violations from $1 million to $2 million.  Obama signs pipeline safety law - UPI

Go Back

Energy Update, January 31, 2011

January 31, 2011

In the States

MN – Several bills have been drafted that would repeal, to differing degrees, a 2007 bipartisan law that bans new coal-fired power plants and the importing of coal-powered electricity until carbon offsets or a plan to lower emissions are in place.  Sponsors are saying that the law places unnecessary burdens on industry, slowing economic recovery once the recession is over.  Governor Mark Dayton has not said yet indicated whether he will veto any particular repeal bill, but he did campaign in part on maintaining a moratorium on new nuclear power plants that is a part of the same law.  Minn. Republicans hope to undo clean energy policiesMinnesota Public Radio

NM – A State Supreme Court ruling has reversed an order by Governor Susana Martinez that blocked publication of regulations aimed at reducing emissions from utilities and dairies within the State.  One of the regulations requires a three percent cut in greenhouse gas emissions every year.  The Court ruled that the regulations must be published in the State’s register, but opponents of the regulations plan to work with the Governor and the State legislature to change the rules.  Court reverses New Mexico Governor on environmental rulesNew York Times

State of the State Addresses

While approximately half of the Governors have given their State of the State or State of the Commonwealth addresses, the realities imposed by the financial downturn caused most Governors to focus their speeches on addressing fiscal difficulties and job creation rather than energy issues.  Still, some Governors incorporated energy plans tied to job creation and retention.

Several Governors cited recent energy business investments that would help lead their States to better fiscal times, including South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard, Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy, and Delaware Governor Jack Markell, all of whom who noted recent increased renewable energy investments or improvements.  Missouri Governor Jay Nixon said that Nordic Windpower USA’s new plant will create 200 jobs, and proposed to create more through the construction of a new nuclear power plant.  Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour noted several investments in his State, including coal, oil, nuclear, LNG, solar, ethanol, coal-to-liquids, and carbon capture projects. 

A few Governors called for increased domestic renewable energy production.  For example, Hawaii Governor Neal Abercrombie expressed support for accelerating renewable energy projects in his State, and improving Hawaii’s energy security.  Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval called for more renewables on federal lands, saying, “I support all efforts to make Nevada the renewable energy capital of the country.” 

Some Governors discussed a mix of fossil fuels and renewable energy resources available to their states.  Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell said he hoped to make Virginia the “Energy Capital of the East Coast” by investing, in part, in solar, wind, waste-to-energy, and biomass, and promoting offshore wind by leasing offshore parcels for wind energy production and serving as headquarters for the Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy Consortium.  But he also called for increasing oil, coal, gas, and nuclear energy production.  While Alaska Governor Sean Parnell said that investments in hydroelectric power and renewable energy grants in his State would create jobs and help the State meet his goal of 50% renewable power by 2025, he also wants to lower taxes on oil production in order to create more jobs.  Wyoming Governor Matt Mead discussed “value-added” projects such as combing wind power with gas-fired turbines, as well the manufacturing of wind turbine components.  In addition, he supports continued use of coal while making it a cleaner fuel through carbon capture and sequestration, and also advocates greater use of carbon injection technologies for enhanced oil extraction, as well as coal gasification.  

In discussing his State’s abundant fossil fuel resources, West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin said he will aggressively pursue the State’s lawsuit against the U.S. EPA over mountaintop removal regulations, and that he supports development of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia and carbon capture and sequestration.  

Links to all of the Governors’ addresses can be found at the State of the State Speeches Calendar on Stateline.org

National News

President Barack Obama gave his annual State of the Union speech to Congress last week, during which he issued a challenge of producing 80% of electricity from clean energy sources by 2035.  President Obama said that all forms of energy production are needed to meet this goal, and mentioned nuclear power, clean coal, and natural gas in addition to wind and solar.  U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, who gave the Republican response to the State of the Union, emphasized the need for less government spending and a more limited government rather than new investments.  Several high-ranking Democrats expressed support for the idea of a broader clean energy mandate while most Republicans remained skeptical about incentivizing one energy type over another or imposing mandates on the private sector.  Senators laud “clean energy” pushPolitico and State of the Union (Transcript)White House and State of the Union Response (Transcript)House Budget Committee

According to a new report commissioned by the federal government as required in the 2009 Defense Authorization Act, the United States military would not receive any significant benefit from greater use of alternative fuels.  The study, performed by the RAND Corporation, said that focusing on energy efficiency would have a greater impact on lowering greenhouse gases.  The report received criticism from Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for the Navy Thomas W. Hicks, who said he was not consulted by RAND, and that the report ignores energy security issues, and from environmental groups, biofuels proponents, the Algal Biomass Organization, and others.  RAND says that while the military is a major consumer of liquid fuels, it still only uses two percent of the country’s daily intake, and since some biofuels are still in their infancy, the money spent on alternative fuels in the military would have a small effect on greenhouse gas emissions.  Alternative fuels don’t benefit the military, a RAND report saysNew York Times

 

Go Back

Energy Update, January 14, 2011

January 14, 2011

In the States

MA – Governor Deval Patrick’s administration has set a new limit on statewide greenhouse gas emissions that will require the State to emit 25% less pollutants than it did in 1990 within ten years.  While the State’s Global Warming Solutions Act of 2008 mandated the State to impose a limit on greenhouse gas emissions, the Patrick administration chose a higher limit than any other State, and one that makes Massachusetts the only State on track to reduce emissions 80% below 1990 levels by 2050.  The State was already on track to lower emissions 18% below 1990 levels by 2020, but the State has adopted several new low-impact policies in order to meet the higher standard, including energy efficiency ratings on buildings, scaling auto insurance rates based on the amount of miles driven, and considering environmental impacts when issuing permits.  New jobs weatherizing homes and in manufacturing and research will number between 42,000 and 48,000 according to the State.  State sets tougher limits on emissionsBoston Globe

MI – Governor Rick Snyder’s administration is appealing a court’s ruling that rejected the denial of a permit for a coal-fired power plant based on a lack of need for the electricity and on the grounds that it would increase greenhouse gas emissions.  The permit was denied by environmental regulators under then-Governor Jennifer Granholm, who issued an executive order requiring the need for electricity and the amount of emissions to be taken into account when issuing permits.  Environmental groups praised Governor Snyder and Attorney General Bill Schuette for filing the appeal and maintaining the same position on this issue as the prior administration.  State to appeal decision rejecting denial of coal permitDetroit Free Press

NM – Governor Susana Martinez dismissed all of the members of the Environmental Improvement Board (E.I.B.) and overturned an E.I.B. regulation just before its publication that would have required greenhouse gas emissions to be cut by three percent each year.  The Governor also halted another regulation that would have limited discharges from dairies in southern New Mexico.  A third E.I.B. regulation adopted by the Board on Election Day would limit emissions from stationary sources such as power plants and allow emitters to trade emission allowances.  This rule is scheduled to go into effect in 2012 and remains in place, at least temporarily.  The Governor campaigned on a promise to overturn regulations that could prove harmful to the State’s economy.  2 environmental rules halted in New MexicoNew York Times

OR – Governor John Kitzhaber has directed his State’s Energy Department to perform 500 energy audits using $2 million in leftover federal recovery funds.  The Governor’s plan calls for using $70 million in funds from energy utilities to retrofit schools across the State after all the audits have been performed.  Governor Kitzhaber says the audits will allow the State to “be very strategic to get the biggest bank for the buck,” and that he will meet regularly with business leaders to maximize job creation.  Governor targets job creationThe World

TX – A three-judge panel in Washington, DC denied Texas’ motion to block regulators from issuing pollution permits to major sources of greenhouse gas emissions as required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the third such denial.  All other States now either issue permits to these polluters or allow the U.S. EPA to issue them.  Texas will continue fighting the regulation in court on the grounds that the U.S. EPA lacks legal authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions under the Clean Air Act.  A spokesperson for the Attorney General said the regulation puts “the jobs and livelihoods of thousands of Texas families and businesses at risk” and called the rules an “unlawful overreach.”  The U.S. EPA is seeking public input before issuing final regulations in Texas, where it is currently using interim regulations to issue permits to polluters.  Texas loses another round in fight over EPA regulation of greenhouse gasesDallas Morning News and EPA seeking input before finalizing Texas rulesHouston Chronicle

WA – Governors Christine Gregoire of Washington and Brian Schweitzer of Montana met recently to discuss a terminal planned in Washington State that would export coal extracted from Montana and Wyoming to China and other Asian countries.  After an initial approval by the county in which the terminal is proposed to be located, environmental groups appealed that decision and Washington’s Ecology Department has said environmental impacts from the intended use of the coal shipments should be taken into account during the permitting process.  Governor Schweitzer supports the project, citing the potential for job creation.  While Governor Gregoire does not want to stifle growth, she would like to ensure that environmental and regulatory processes are followed.  Montana, Washington Governors discuss coal exportsThe Olympian

WV – The U.S. EPA has revoked a permit issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the largest mountaintop-removal coal mine in the State, citing the harmful effect the project would have on water quality downstream from the seven miles of streams it would bury.  Hal Quinn, President of the National Mining Association said the EPA is “weakening the trust U.S. businesses and workers need to make investments and secure jobs.”  The U.S. EPA maintains it reserves the power to intervene in permits issued by the Corps of Engineers and exercises this authority “for only unacceptable cases.”  EPA vetoes water permit for W. Va. mountaintop mineCharleston Daily Mail

 

Go Back

Energy Update, October 8, 2010

October 8, 2010

In the States

AZ – Governor Jan Brewer, speaking to the Algal Biomass Organization, heralded plans for the Arizona Center for Algae Technologies and Innovations, a new research center for algae-based fuels to be built at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus.  It is to be constructed with $2 million in federal stimulus funds and $2 million in private investment bundled by the university and the Science Foundation, a public/private partnership created to diversify Arizona’s research and development initiatives.  The Governor said that the facility “will expand Arizona’s potential as a national global leader in research and production in algae fuel,” which she said could produce billions of dollars in investments and millions of gallons of fuel that would be used to power vehicles and aircraft.   Brewer announces investment in algae fuels researchArizona Republic

OH – A 500-acre section of land on a decommissioned coal strip mine in southeast Ohio – a piece of land comparable in size to a small airport – will soon be home to a 50-megawatt solar farm capable of providing electricity to 25,000 homes.  Governor Ted Strickland, who signed a 2008 law requiring 12.5% of electricity to be renewable, said “the future has recognized Ohio” and that the venture would bring 600 jobs to the area, 300 of them permanent.  Isofoton, the Spanish solar panel maker behind the project, passed over other States, in part due to State and federal tax credits, loan guarantees, and a grant.  Twenty megawatts will be installed in about two years with the rest completed in about four years.  Huge solar panel farm coming to southeast OhioCleveland Plain Dealer

TX – Governor Rick Perry spoke to academic and industry professionals at the Sixth Annual Clean Carbon Policy Summit and Project Expo this week.  In his speech, the Governor outlined the progress Texas has made toward diversifying the sources from which it obtains energy, cleaning the air Texans breathe, and growing the State’s economy.  Governor Perry also said that “technology and innovation could propel us into a world of cleaner, more efficient energy generated from all sources, and where the United States could be much less dependent on foreign countries for energy.”  Texas continues to lead way toward US energy independenceGov Monitor

WV – In response to regulations from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that restrict mountaintop removal – a process in which mountaintops are blasted off in order to more easily reach coal, and which releases toxic chemicals into nearby streams – Governor Joe Manchin directed his State to sue the US EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers.  Governor Manchin called the regulations “attempts to destroy our coal industry and way of life in West Virginia,” and said that only two of the 23 applications for permits that were pending last year – when the regulations went into effect – have been approved.  West Virginia sues US over mining restrictionsNew York Times

According to a new report released by the National Governors Association, every State and territory in the US has worked to increase its use of clean energy in some way.  The report identified seven categories of clean energy enhancements, ranging from energy efficiency to alternative fuels to green economic development, and found that States are undertaking these initiatives for environmental reasons, to save in energy costs, and to create jobs.  The report says that 49 States changed policies on clean electricity, 47 expanded energy efficiency, and 39 promoted clean energy as an economic growth strategy.  Report: States’ actions are promoting green energyAmerican City & County

National News

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has approved proposals to build the first solar farms on over 6,500 acres of federal land in California, and is expected to approve several similar projects soon.  More than 750 megawatts of electricity will be generated by the approved projects, enough to power over 550,000 homes, with more than three times that much capacity in the pending projects.  A new transmission line has also been approved to get the electricity into homes, but it is being challenged in court. A portion of the approved solar farms will be financed with federal stimulus funds and federal loan guarantees.  Solar power plants to rise on US landNew York Times

The Obama Administration has released four scenarios in a notice of intent outlining proposed requirements for fuel economy in cars and light trucks between 2017 and 2025.  Raising the fuel economy requirements three percent per year – the most modest increase – would result in a mileage standard of 47 miles per gallon by 2025, an increase from 34.1 in 2016, while the most ambitious proposal would increase fuel efficiency six percent per year, ending at 62 miles per gallon in 2025.  While more detailed proposals are due out in November, a point of contention with the proposals is how emissions from electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles will be calculated.  Since they do not produce any emissions themselves when powered by electricity, but do utilize  electricity generated by coal and  natural gas burning power plants, an alternative measure, such as grams of carbon emissions per mile, could be used to develop comparable emissions ratings. Fuel economy will be, um, betterNew York Times

Go Back

Energy Update January 15, 2010

January 15, 2010

In the States

AZ – Governor Jan Brewer discussed her ideas on the future of energy in Arizona at a business conference in Phoenix, calling for more wind, solar, and nuclear energy production.  The Governor said she is a “strong advocate for the development of more nuclear energy in Arizona,” calling the energy source “the cornerstone of our clean energy future.”  She also said she is “committed to making Arizona the solar capital of the world,” proposed adding incentives and easing regulations, and signed two executive orders to help promote solar energy.  Brewer pushes for nuclear as key part of energy goalsArizona Republic

MD – As the session begins in the State general assembly, Governor Martin O’Malley is preparing to push for a low-cost plan to increase solar energy, offshore wind development, and electric cars.  The Governor is proposing smaller changes to comply with the legislature’s existing goal of generating 20% of Maryland’s energy from renewable sources by 2022, and a need to cut $2 billion from the State budget.  Examples include streamlining the process to allow transmission lines from offshore wind farms and a tax break on new electric vehicles.  O’Malley to press for legislation on renewable energyBaltimore Sun

NM – Governor Bill Richardson has signed an executive order instructing several state agencies to coordinate efforts to promote the growth of green jobs and renewable energy.  The agencies are tasked with improving the electrical grid, commercializing new clean energy technologies, attracting renewable energy companies to the state, streamlining the permit process for alternative energy projects, and promoting commercial-scale geothermal energy.  Richardson orders new steps to build green economyNew Mexico Business Weekly

WV – In his State of the State address, Governor Joe Manchin praised the energy sector and defended the coal industry.  The Governor stressed balancing the economy and the environment, heralding both increased wind energy development and new technologies that will allow more drilling for oil and natural gas.  His speech also focused on supporting the coal industry by noting the fuel’s ubiquity and low cost, praising an upcoming project to control greenhouse gas emissions at a power plant, and criticizing efforts to “villainize this resource that helped us win two world wars and built the greatest country in the world.”  West Virginians urged to ‘stand up for our coal miners’Charleston Gazette

National News

President Barack Obama has announced $2.3 billion in tax credits that is expected to leverage an additional $5 billion in private investment, help complete 183 clean energy projects, and create more than 17,000 new jobs.  The credits will be provided for a wide variety of projects, including solar, wind, and geothermal energy production, fuel cells, electric cars, carbon capture and sequestration technology, and energy efficiency products.  White House awards $2.3 billion in tax credits for clean energy developersNew York Times

Go Back

Energy Update, November 13, 2009

November 13, 2009

In the States

TX – A new report from Environment Texas, using data from the US Department of Energy, shows that although Texas produces more carbon dioxide than any other state, its carbon dioxide emissions were reduced by 2% from 2004 to 2007 while the US collectively increased those emissions by 0.7% during the same period.  Governor Rick Perry said the report shows that the State is able to reduce emissions without imposing taxes or regulations and expressed opposition to federal climate change legislation that he believes would harm industry in Texas.  Report: Texas greenhouse gas emissions downAssociated Press

UT – Governor Gary Herbert made his first trip to Washington DC since assuming the office of Governor to reach out to the Obama administration on contentious oil and gas leases in Utah.  The Bush administration moved the auction for the leases up to December 2008, during which an activist bid up the cost of the leases without having the money to buy them.  Interior Secretary Ken Salazar subsequently cancelled many of the leases due to environmental concerns and the fraudulent bids.  The Governor met with Deputy Interior Secretary David Hayes to discuss how they could work together to deliver some of the leases to companies that had submitted legitimate bids; the Deputy Secretary invited the State and the companies to provide a legal argument for not cancelling the auctions that included fraudulent bids.  Guv stresses public lands on DC tripDeseret News and A bid too far: Utah oil lease activist Tim DeChristopher faces jail timeWall Street Journal

WV – Governor Joe Manchin held a private meeting with federal and state officials and coal industry representatives to discuss the future of coal.  After the meeting, the Governor held a press conference to announce his intention to join West Virginia Senator Jay Rockefeller and Representatives Nick Rahall and Shelley Moore Capito in a high-level meeting with US EPA officials to discuss new regulations on mountaintop removal.  Rep. Rahall said that during their meeting coal executives expressed confusion over the regulations and Rep. Capito said two meetings she had previously scheduled with the EPA were cancelled.  W. Va. Gov. to host private meeting on coalAssociated Press and W. Va. Leaders seek coal answers from White HouseCharleston Gazette

Regional and National News

Mid-Atlantic – Governors Jack Markell of Delaware, Martin O’Malley of Maryland, and Tim Kaine of Virginia have agreed to coordinate the efforts of their states to produce wind energy offshore and transmit it throughout the region while creating new jobs.  Each state is interested in developing offshore wind power and stands to gain from the resources such a collaboration would provide. MD, DE, VA enter offshore wind power partnershipThe Capital and Governors commit to offshore wind energyWTOP

Federal – Democratic Senators passed the Senate’s climate change bill out of the Environment and Public Works Committee 11-1 despite a Republican boycott of the hearings.  To move the bill, committee chair Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) bypassed a rule that would have required participation by both parties.  Republicans, who boycotted the hearings because they believed not enough time was provided to read the bill and thought the EPA had failed to adequately study the costs, objected to the bill’s passage without their input.  Though the bill passed the committee, many Senators believe that another bill, being crafted by Senators John Kerry (D-MA), Joe Lieberman (I-CT), and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) to allow more nuclear energy and offshore drilling, is more likely to pass the Senate.  Many Senators also believe that no other major action will be taken on climate change legislation in the Senate until next year.  Democrats move on emissions billWashington Post and Democrats push climate bill through panel without GOP debateNew York Times and Climate bill likely on the shelf for rest of the yearWall Street Journal

Senator Chuck Schumer has sent a letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu asking him to refuse stimulus money for a wind farm project in Texas unless the “high-value components, including the wind turbines, are manufactured in the United States.”  The letter was prompted by an Investigative Reporting Workshop study that found that 84% of stimulus money for green projects has gone to foreign companies and that the project in Texas in particular will create 2,000 jobs in China and 300 in Texas.  The Texas project is being financed by $450 million in stimulus funds and more than $1 billion in investments from Chinese banks.  Schumer seeks to block stimulus money for Chinese-backed Texas wind farmNew York Times

Stimulus Funding -- The US Department of Energy announced nearly $500 million in new stimulus grants, including $338 million of stimulus money awarded to 123 schools, tribes, local governments, and national laboratories to advance geothermal energy development.  Another $155 million of additional stimulus funds is being used to leverage $634 million of private investment for industrial energy efficiency projects.  The Treasury Department has also issued $2.2 billion in Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs) that will act as low-interest loans to help energy co-ops, governmental entities, and public power providers develop clean renewable energy projects such as wind or solar power.  Department of Energy awards $338 million to accelerate domestic geothermal energyEERE News and Secretary Chu announces more than $155 million for industrial energy efficiency projectsEERE News and Treasury allocates $2.2 billion in bonds for renewable energy developmentTreasury Department Press Room

Go Back

Energy Update, October 2, 2009

October 2, 2009

In the States

CA – This week, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger hosted the Global Climate Summit 2, which gathered over 1,200 participants from across the U.S. and the world to help discuss climate change issues and influence national policy in their countries prior to the UN summit planned for Copenhagen, Denmark in December.  California officials also hoped the summit would allow other governments to see what the state has accomplished and build on its achievements in negotiating a new global climate change pact at that meeting.  Topics included how to decrease energy usage, how to obtain cleaner energy, and how to best offset greenhouse gas emissions.  Schwarzenegger leads governors’ summit on global warmingChristian Science Monitor and Climate summit delegates like state’s planned carbon trading marketLos Angeles Times

NC – In a letter to US Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar, Governor Bev Perdue indicated she may be willing to consider offshore oil and gas drilling depending on the amount of reserves located off North Carolina’s shore and whether a panel of scientists and engineers she plans to assemble indicate drilling can be done safely and without hampering offshore wind energy development.  Governor Perdue commented on a draft proposal prepared by the Bush administration, which would allow certain sites to be explored for possible extraction of fossil fuels.  The Governor would also like more information on the share of oil and gas revenues the State could expect to receive.  Secretary Salazar has indicated he is likely to scale back the proposal before presenting it to President Obama and Congress prior to final approval.  Perdue indicates she’s open to offshore drillingWinston-Salem Journal

PA – Governor Ed Rendell spoke at a news conference to covey the importance of clean energy to Pennsylvania’s financial and environmental goals.  He cited the State’s $900 million of investment since 2003, an energy portfolio standard that mandates the development of alternative energy sources, energy conservation laws, and adoption of the California Clean Car Rule to reduce emissions from mobile sources as actions that have helped reduce greenhouse gas emissions and created thousands of new jobs.  The Governor also expressed support for more research on carbon capture and storage technologies.  Rendell calls for clean energy developmentPittsburgh Post-Gazette

TX – Governor Rick Perry voiced strong opposition to federal climate change legislation during a meeting with State business and political leaders.  The Governor said that Texas has done well in balancing the interests of business and the environment and that new federal mandates on carbon emissions and other climate changing pollution would raise the prices of many everyday products for consumers and eliminate 200,000 to 300,000 jobs in the State.  He suggested the Federal Government should follow Texas’ lead by expanding the nation’s alternative energy portfolio, reducing the cost of alternative energy forms like solar and wind, and promoting investment in technology that captures emissions of carbon dioxide rather than institute a cap-and-trade policy.  Texas governor voices opposition to climate billAustin American-Statesman

WV – Governor Joe Manchin gave a speech to the US Chamber of Commerce in which he noted that while coal may create pollution, coal-producing states such as West Virginia have helped build a vibrant American economy.  The Governor believes that the pending House cap and trade legislation, in its current form, will cost too many jobs and that there may be ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by recycling carbon dioxide into a useful product.  He also raised concerns about the potential for newly created alternative energy industry jobs moving offshore if production costs prove to be too high in the US.  Manchin calls for energy balanceCharleston Daily Mail

Regional and National News

Attracting renewable energy manufacturing plants and workers is less difficult for states that have generous incentive programs than for those that do not.  Some states provide millions of dollars in tax and other incentives for companies to build such facilities – which produce not only renewable energy technology but high-paying and high-skill jobs – while other state provide little or none.  With renewable energy becoming a key component of economic development, states are competing to provide more generous subsidies in return for new clean energy investment and jobs.  Clean-energy jobs touch off bidding wars between statesUSA Today

Senators John Kerry and Barbara Boxer have introduced the Senate’s version of climate change legislation.  Many details are missing from the bill as it is currently written, though the two sponsors say it will be deficit-neutral.  The bill would require a reduction in carbon emissions to 20% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050 through a cap-and-trade mechanism, cleaner coal technologies, natural gas, and nuclear energy production, more solar and wind energy production, and increased energy efficiency.  Republican leaders have already voiced opposition to the bill, calling it a tax on families and small businesses while environmental advocates have expressed mixed reactions.  Boxer, Kerry launch campaign to pass Senate cap-and-trade billNew York Times and Overview [pdf], Section-by-section summary [pdf], and Bill text [pdf] for S.1733 – Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act

To date, more than $1 billion in stimulus funds has already been spent on clean energy projects, including $550 million that was just awarded for new renewable energy production (in lieu of tax credits), $300 million for energy conservation efforts in public housing projects, and $36 million for energy efficiency projects in Pennsylvania.  An additional $410 million in stimulus funds have been recently announced, including $161 million for a wind power transmission line, $144 million to advance the smart grid, and $106 million for Energy Efficiency Community Block Grants.  Treasury, Energy surpass $1 billion milestone in Recovery Act awards for clean energy projectsEERE News and U.S. Treasury and DOE award $550 million for renewable energy projectsEERE News and HUD grants $300 million in Recovery Act funds for green housingEERE News and DOE delivers $36 million to Pennsylvania for energy efficiency projectsEERE News and Recovery Act helps to fund transmission line for Montana wind powerEERE News and DOE announces $144 Million in Recovery Act funding for the smart gridEERE News and Obama administration delivers more than $106 million for energy efficiency and conservation projects in nine statesEERE News

Go Back

Energy Update, August 22, 2008

August 22, 2008
In The States

CO/CA – Governor Ritter, in coordination with Governor Schwarzenegger of California, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, and National Automobile Dealers Association, has issued a packet of information to help vehicle owners to become more energy efficient when driving. The goal of the release is to reduce demand for gasoline – and save consumers money. "The cheapest gallon of gas is the gallon you never buy,” said Governor Ritter. Helping drivers shift to greenDenver Post

CT – Connecticut is on track to become a major producer of hydrogen and fuel cells. Proponents of hydrogen-powered automobiles say that consumers could be driving them in two to seven years, and companies within the state should be producing the hydrogen and the fuel cells that power those cars. The industry is pushing the State to provide some incentives to help it grow. Earlier this month, Governor M. Jodi Rell announced $250,000 of the state’s money would be used to build the state’s first hydrogen fuel station. State may play role in advancement of hydrogen vehiclesNew Haven Register

MD – Governor O’Malley told the Maryland Association of Counties that brownouts and blackouts in the state are imminent unless something in done to reduce the demand on the electrical grid. He called for more renewable energy in the form of offshore wind farms, more government regulation of the utility industry, more local electricity production, smart meters, and encouraging residents to use electricity in off-peak hours. Critics say that government regulations will not help and that the plans may cost more for consumers. Energy gets top billing at O’Malley’s MACo speechThe Gazette

ME – Just off Maine’s shore is the potential for 45 times as much wind-generated electricity as Maine consumes at its peak. Blue H has developed a way to create wind energy in deep waters out of sight of the shore, which is easier to set up, lighter, and more efficient than previous offshore wind turbines. Company officials, some of whom have met with state officials including Gov. Baldacci, say that not only is Maine rich in wind energy, but in skilled labor (such as shipbuilders) who can build the massive structures necessary to harness it. Wind power firm eyes MaineBangor Daily News

OR – A debate is already brewing for next year’s state legislature: whether to repeal the requirement that all gasoline sold in Oregon is a 10% blend of ethanol. The Governor has said repeatedly that he does not favor a repeal; lawmakers from both parties (though mostly Republicans) say the law drives up food prices and may cost consumers more at the pump if they don’t get as many miles per gallon as regular gasoline. Republicans join call for biofuel mandate repealOregon Public Broadcasting News

WV – Two groups of advocates are attempting to move West Virginia in two different directions. The Coal Forum, which includes Governor Joe Manchin, Senator Jay Rockefeller, and Representative Shelley Moore Capito is advocating more coal power; the Coal River Wind Project is promoting wind power as an alternative to coal, including new wind turbines in the state which will power 150,000 homes. Dueling PR campaigns compete for coal’s fateCharleston Gazette

National news

Due to historically high fuel prices, car use in the United States has declined significantly over the past year. Americans drove 12.2 billion miles less in June 2008 than in June 2007. In just the first quarter of 2008, Americans used 400 million fewer gallons of gasoline and 318 million fewer gallons of diesel than in the first quarter of 2007. Although these developments are positive for the environment, they are also negatively affecting the federal Highway Trust Fund, which finds highway and bridge projects, and for tourism, as families are venturing out less due to the high prices. More Americans keep their cars parkedABC News

Go Back

Energy Update, May 22, 2008

May 13, 2008
CO – Governor Ritter signed several orders which will require the state to lower its greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020 and 80% by 2050. The orders also require companies to measure and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases they emit. Ritter enacts measures to tally greenhouse gasesDenver Post

CT – The state Senate unanimously passed a bill already passed by the House which would require that the state cut its emissions to 10% less than 1990 levels by 2020 and to 80% less than 2001 levels by 2050. It would also require that state agencies be proactive in working toward those goals. It is another in a string of legislation revolving around the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which will implement a cap-and0trade system later this year. Governor Rell has sent mixed signals regarding the legislation, both praising its ends and questioning its costs. State Senate gives solid approval to gas-emission billThe Day

FL – The state House unanimously passed legislation that would overhaul Florida’s energy policy. The new policy would require new homes to be 20% more efficient by 2010 and 50% more efficient by 2019, speed up the process of building new nuclear power plants, and require a certain percentage of electricity to be produced from renewable sources. Green energy bill sails through Florida HouseMiami Herald

KS – The contentious debate over coal-fired power plants in Kansas appears to be over. In the last week of the legislature’s session, Governor Sebelius was offered a compromise by the legislature: allow a slightly smaller version of the plants to be built and the legislature would put more requirements on utilities to produce renewable energy. The Governor did not accept the offer and vetoed the bill, in part because it still stripped the Secretary of Health and Environment of much regulatory power. The House attempted to override the governor’s veto only to come up four votes short. The State Supreme Court put the challenges to the state’s denial of permits on the backburner while political and legal actions run their course. And, even if regulatory barriers are lifted, rising construction costs and an uncertain regulatory future may be too great of a cost to begin construction of the more than $3.6 billion plant. Sebelius given ultimatum on power plantTopeka Capital-Journal and Kansas Supreme Court puts coal-plant cases on hold Lawrence Journal-World and Building cost may be worse setback for coal plantsWichita Eagle and House fails to override third vetoLawrence Journal-World

MA – As the Massachusetts energy bill winds its way through the legislature, Governor Patrick has made several public appearances in support of the legislation and a green economy in general. Governor Patrick says the bill would be an impetus for businesses to conserve energy, and for many to produce and consume renewable energy, through utility regulation and state rebates on equipment such as solar panels. He also said that the age of fossil fuels is coming to an end and that Massachusetts should be leading the world toward renewable energy, and be rewarded with jobs and a healthy economy. Governor says Mass. can reap benefits from clean energyMIT News and Mass. governor urges more action to develop renewable energyForbes.com

MD – Governor Martin O’Malley signed into law the energy bills passed by the legislature in its final week. Included were tax credits for home renewable energy projects, new standards for new and renovated state buildings, requirements that utility companies in the state produce renewable energy, and a state goal of lowering electricity consumption 15% by 2015. Governor holds off on signing “Alcopops” legislationWashington Post and O’Malley inks environment billsGazette.net

OH – Governor Strickland has signed energy legislation into law which will affect the way Ohioans produce and purchase electricity. The law renews some and places other new regulations on utilities, requires utilities to undertake conservation measures to reduce electricity use 22%, and requires that 25% of the electricity used in the state come from renewable or “advanced” energy sources. That 25% figure is broken down more specifically by solar, wind, and other sources. Strickland signs “hybrid” energy billToledo Blade and Ohio may require renewable energyToledo Blade

PA – Two bills have stalled in the Senate that could significantly change the way Pennsylvanians get and use electricity. HB 2200 would promote cost-effective ways to reduce electricity use through energy efficiency and conservation statewide by 1% by 2011 and eventually by 2.5%. SHB 1 would invest $850 million into renewable energy projects. Energy-conservation bills crucialPhiladelphia Inquirer

SC – Of the many energy bills proposed in the Senate this session, three in particular have passed and are in House committees. The bills offer tax breaks and credits for energy-efficient appliances and requires the state to replace incandescent bulbs with Fluorescent ones. Senate gives key approval to energy-saving incentivesSpartanburg Herald-Journal

WV – Three coal mining companies have agreed to limit their operations in response to citizens groups seeking a federal court order and a temporary injunction against the companies’ removal processes. The companies were ordered by a judge to notify nearby residents if they were to add any new fill sites, but failed to comply. Coal operators agree to limit valley fillsCharleston Gazette

Go Back

Energy Update, May 13, 2008

May 6, 2008
In the States

CO – Governor Ritter signed several orders which will require the state to lower its greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020 and 80% by 2050. The orders also require companies to measure and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases they emit. Ritter enacts measures to tally greenhouse gasesDenver Post

CT – The state Senate unanimously passed a bill already passed by the House which would require that the state cut its emissions to 10% less than 1990 levels by 2020 and to 80% less than 2001 levels by 2050. It would also require that state agencies be proactive in working toward those goals. It is another in a string of legislation revolving around the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which will implement a cap-and0trade system later this year. Governor Rell has sent mixed signals regarding the legislation, both praising its ends and questioning its costs. State Senate gives solid approval to gas-emission billThe Day

FL – The state House unanimously passed legislation that would overhaul Florida's energy policy. The new policy would require new homes to be 20% more efficient by 2010 and 50% more efficient by 2019, speed up the process of building new nuclear power plants, and require a certain percentage of electricity to be produced from renewable sources. Green energy bill sails through Florida HouseMiami Herald

KS – The contentious debate over coal-fired power plants in Kansas appears to be over. In the last week of the legislature’s session, Governor Sebelius was offered a compromise by the legislature: allow a slightly smaller version of the plants to be built and the legislature would put more requirements on utilities to produce renewable energy. The Governor did not accept the offer and vetoed the bill, in part because it still stripped the Secretary of Health and Environment of much regulatory power. The House attempted to override the governor’s veto only to come up four votes short. The State Supreme Court put the challenges to the state’s denial of permits on the backburner while political and legal actions run their course. And, even if regulatory barriers are lifted, rising construction costs and an uncertain regulatory future may be too great of a cost to begin construction of the more than $3.6 billion plant. Sebelius given ultimatum on power plantTopeka Capital-Journal and Kansas Supreme Court puts coal-plant cases on holdLawrence Journal-World and Building cost may be worse setback for coal plantsWichita Eagle and House fails to override third vetoLawrence Journal-World

MA – As the Massachusetts energy bill winds its way through the legislature, Governor Patrick has made several public appearances in support of the legislation and a green economy in general. Governor Patrick says the bill would be an impetus for businesses to conserve energy, and for many to produce and consume renewable energy, through utility regulation and state rebates on equipment such as solar panels. He also said that the age of fossil fuels is coming to an end and that Massachusetts should be leading the world toward renewable energy, and be rewarded with jobs and a healthy economy. Governor says Mass. can reap benefits from clean energyMIT News and Mass. governor urges more action to develop renewable energyForbes.com

MD – Governor Martin O’Malley signed into law the energy bills passed by the legislature in its final week. Included were tax credits for home renewable energy projects, new standards for new and renovated state buildings, requirements that utility companies in the state produce renewable energy, and a state goal of lowering electricity consumption 15% by 2015. Governor holds off on signing “Alcopops” legislationWashington Post and O’Malley inks environment billsGazette.net

OH – Governor Strickland has signed energy legislation into law which will affect the way Ohioans produce and purchase electricity. The law renews some and places other new regulations on utilities, requires utilities to undertake conservation measures to reduce electricity use 22%, and requires that 25% of the electricity used in the state come from renewable or “advanced” energy sources. That 25% figure is broken down more specifically by solar, wind, and other sources. Strickland signs “hybrid” energy billToledo Blade and Ohio may require renewable energyToledo Blade

PA – Two bills have stalled in the senate which could significantly change the way Pennsylvanians get and use electricity. HB 2200 would promote cost-effective ways to reduce electricity use through energy efficiency and conservation statewide by 1% by 2011 and eventually by 2.5%. SHB 1 would invest $850 million into renewable energy projects. Energy-conservation bills crucialPhiladelphia Inquirer

SC – Of the many energy bills proposed in the Senate this session, three in particular have passed and are in House committees. The bills offter tax breaks and credits for energy-efficient appliances and requires the state to replace incandescent bulbs with Flurescent ones. Senate gives key approval to energy-saving incentivesSpartanburg Herald-Journal

WV – Three coal mining companies have agreed to limit their operations in response to citizens groups seeking a federal court order and a temporary injunction against the companies’ removal processes. The companies were ordered by a judge to notify nearby residents if they were to add any new fill sites, but failed to comply. Coal operators agree to limit valley fillsCharleston Gazette

Go Back

Energy Update, April 4, 2008

April 4, 2008
In the States

CO – A bill has been put forth in the legislature, HB 1350, which would allow state and local governments to loan money with low- or no- interest to homeowners for the purchase and installation of solar panels. The bill is designed to remove the barrier of upfront costs which homeowners face when purchasing a solar system. A similar bill, SB 184, would provide loans to low-income homeowners for energy efficiency projects like new windows or insulation. Bill gives solar panels brighter possibilitiesDenver Post

IL – Plans to build a coal gasification power plant on the campus of Southern Illinois University Carbondale have stopped in the pre-feasibility-study phase. Officials said the results of the study provided “more questions than answers,” but said they will continue pursuing new opportunities and remain proactive. No real answersThe Southern

KS – The state Senate has produced another bill which would allow two new coal-fired power plants to be built in Kansas, despite the veto of Governor Sebelius last month. The House created another similar bill last week. It appears doubtful that the House has enough votes to override the governor’s veto at this time. New coal-plant bill emerges in Senate Lawrence Journal-World

MD – Governor O’Malley attempted to pass several energy proposals in the final two weeks of this legislative session. As of Friday, two bills had passed in both the House and the Senate: one (SB 205) sets a goal of reducing consumption of energy by 15% by 2015 and the other directs money received from the auction of carbon credits through the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative toward renewable energy projects (though the exact amounts will have to be worked out). Another bill which has passed the Senate (SB 209) would increase the amount of renewable energy in the state’s portfolio with a goal of 20% by 2022. Senate gives initial approval to energy billsThe Daily Times and Senate rejects energy billBaltimore Sun and Part of O’Malley’s plan hits snag in SenateWashington Post and Senate reverses on energyBaltimore Sun and Constellation settlement gets preliminary approvalWashington Post

MO – Kansas City is waiting for Governor Blunt to decide whether the city will get a waiver, allowing the sale of gasoline with no ethanol. The state passed a law last year that requires all gasoline sold in the state to be an E10 blend, unless the governor grants a waiver. The city wants the waiver because of concerns over smog. KC awaits Blunt’s waiver of ethanol blend mandateThe Kansas City Star

OH – The Republican-controlled state House is rewriting Governor Strickland’s energy bill, and is pushing for a change in the way rates are determined. There is also disagreement on the way a mandate on changing the renewable energy portfolio should be implemented. The rewrite is due to be released soon. Ohio House wrapping up rewrite of energy billCleveland Plain Dealer

TN – The plan to ban coal mining above 2,000 feet to protect mountains and streams, which had mild support from the governor, has died in a House subcommittee and will not be discussed this session in the Senate. Bill on surface mining haltedKnoxville News Sentinel

VA – Governor Kaine has said that he has no control over whether a new coal-fired power plant will be built in VA’s coal country and that he does not oppose it anyway. He agrees with Dominion, the energy company attempting to build the plant, that more power will become necessary as more people move to the state and said that “We are not going to eliminate coal, a native source that we have, as one of the sources that will power our country. The portion [of the energy supply] that is coal is going to get smaller, and it is going to get cleaner, but we are not going to abandon coal from the portfolio.” Kaine says coal-burning power plant is necessaryThe Washington Post

WI – Governor Doyle has announced a new energy initiative that would increase the amount of energy from renewable sources to 25% of all energy within 17 years, produce 10% of all renewable energy products, and lead the nation in researching alternative energy. The plan calls for interaction between the state’s Office of Energy Independence and communities from around the state to find the best solution for that particular community. Another goal of the initiative is to provide green-collar jobs, which one organization estimated to be over 35,000. Doyle pushing for renewable energyThe Badger Herald and Governor launches program focusing on renewable fuels, energy research Green Bay Press–Gazette

WV – A new study from WVU claims that residents that live in coal-producing counties have a greater risk of early death and disease than those that do not, even after controlling for other factors such as age, obesity, smoking, and diet. Governor Manchin said he has no immediate plans to investigate the effects of coal in WV and the state’s Dept. of Environmental Protection secretary says that such an investigation “isn’t DEP’s job.” Manchin plans no investigation of coal, health Charleston Gazette

On The Hill

Lobbyists are counting on grassroots efforts to help pass the Lieberman-Warner bill and the Renewable Energy Tax Credits bill. Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, and other volunteer-driven organizations are using education centers to motivate citizens to call their representatives while industry groups and the National Taxpayers Union’s have a mixed advertising and grassroots campaign. Green lobbyists seek grass-roots lovePolitico

Go Back

13 blog posts