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Energy Update, February 25, 2011

In the States

MD – Governor Martin O’Malley recently proposed legislation that would require utilities in the State to purchase wind energy generated off the coast of Ocean City.  The Governor’s plan calls the development of an offshore wind farm that would provide enough energy to power half the homes in Baltimore and could create as many as 2,000 construction and manufacturing jobs.  Legislators generally approve of the plan, but are concerned about potential additional costs to ratepayers, which are expected to average $1.44 per month.  The U.S. Interior Department, which is attempting to streamline offshore wind development, has said the required leases could be issued by the end of the year.  Environmental groups back O’Malley’s offshore wind planWashington Post

WY – Governor Matt Mead has filed three petitions in the U.S. Circuit Court against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), claiming that the federal agency moved too quickly in imposing a federal plan to regulate greenhouse gases.  The suit was filed, at least in part, because of what Governor Mead called “unreasonable deadlines” the EPA gave the State to revise it’s permitting system to comply with federal requirements; while the EPA often gives States three years to revise their rules, Wyoming was given only nine days.  Wyoming joins Peabody Energy, the National Mining Association, and the State of Texas in suing the U.S. EPA over the regulations.  Wyo. Joins Texas in suing EPA over rollout of greenhouse gas regulationsNew York Times

National News

The U.S. EPA has made several changes to a rule on industrial boilers and incinerators that will cost industry half as much for compliance as originally estimated.  Operators of the boilers and incinerators will collectively pay $1.8 billion less per year because of exemptions for clean-fuel burning plants and greatly reduced compliance requirements for smaller boilers.  The EPA, responding to opposition in Congress and an executive order from President Barack Obama requiring a review of regulations that could slow job growth, said that 2,200 jobs would be created through the updated regulations, which are intended to reduce mercury and other emissions.  While acknowledging the changes included in the proposed rule made sense boiler and incinerator operator groups would like to see further modifications that would mitigate the fiscal impacts on manufacturers, universities, and industrial energy providers after additional public comments are filed.  EPA trims costs to control toxic air pollutionWashington Post

 

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